Inter-City Express
Friday, June 21, 2024
GUEST COLUMNS

Friday, June 21, 2024

The legal battle against Kroger serves as a reminder of the critical role played by regulators and consumers in holding corporations accountable for their advertising claims.
The Supreme Court unanimously decided that the Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine and other parties did not have standing to challenge the FDA's approval of the abortion-inducing drug mifepristone in 2000, nor the FDA's relaxations of some restrictions on the drug's use.
Thinking out loud about revised Civil Code 2924m, which allows more time for bidding and may permit a bankruptcy filing after the foreclosure auction.
Legal rights to use water — particularly those obtained prior to 1914 — lie at the heart of California's perpetual wrangling over the allocation of increasingly limited water supplies.
Academic success is as much dependent on how students feel about themselves as the letter grades that fill their transcripts. In fact, the two might be more correlated than they appear.
Several members of California's Legislative Black Caucus launched a statewide tour in San Diego Saturday to promote a slate of 14 reparations bills, including a measure that could change the state constitution to end forced prison labor.
When a judge ruled recently that a controversial state housing law did not apply to a handful of southern California cities, Julie Testa saw it as an invitation.

Wednesday, June 19, 2024

A plot of land where Interstate 5 crosses the American River in Sacramento was once occupied by the Rusty Duck and Hungry Hunter restaurants, but they've closed and their buildings have long been vacant.
After legislative leaders failed to reach an agreement with Gov. Gavin Newsom about how to close California's projected multibillion-dollar deficit, the Legislature passed a placeholder state budget Thursday, just ahead of a mandatory deadline.

Tuesday, June 18, 2024

California has 44 state symbols, including a state folk dance, dinosaur and mushroom. But Assemblymember Diane Dixon says we need another — an official state seashell.
Several dozen dams throughout California could store up to 107 billion more gallons of water if they underwent repairs to fix safety problems. But facing a staggering state deficit, Gov. Gavin Newsom has proposed cutting funding for a dam repair grant program in half this year, while state legislators want the $50 million restored.

Monday, June 17, 2024

Gov. Gavin Newsom has removed one member and demoted the chairperson of a state workplace safety board who criticized his administration's handling of a proposed heat protection rule this year.
You can talk about guns at California state fairgrounds. You can advertise guns there, too. You can even, in the words of a gun rights group, host "a celebration of America's gun culture." What you cannot do, according to a ruling Tuesday by a three-judge panel on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, is buy or sell a firearm on property owned by the state.

Thursday, June 13, 2024

As lobbyists for businesses and labor groups negotiate with Gov. Gavin Newsom's administration on how to amend a unique California labor law that allows workers to sue their bosses, the two sides seem to agree on at least one puzzling reality.
Imagine growing up in a home where tap water consistently runs a stomach-churning brown, sometimes with an odor.
As many as 300,000 Californians have until June 30 to take advantage of a one-time offer to qualify for faster student loan forgiveness, lower monthly payments or outright forgiveness for federal loans borrowed before 2010.
One year after Gov. Gavin Newsom proposed changing the U.S. Constitution to place new restrictions on gun ownership, no other states have joined his campaign for a 28th amendment.

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

Many adults in California are missing out on financial aid for college — and for years, the state declined to help.

Monday, June 10, 2024

As Dr. Rishi Patel's street medicine van bounces over dirt roads and empty fields in rural Kern County, he's looking for a particular patient he knows is overdue for her shot.
President Biden's long-predicted executive actions restricting asylum claims at the U.S.-Mexico border were expected to take effect at midnight Tuesday in remote parts of California where some migrants gather in open-air camps to await federal processing.

Friday, June 7, 2024

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Southern Pacific Railroad wielded almost total control over California's politics, angering farmers who believed they were being gouged by high freight rates and fueling a powerful populist movement.
When La Prensa publisher and longtime Chula Vista resident Art Castañares first filed a public records request in 2021 to review video footage from police department drones, he wanted "to see how police use the new drones and whether they may be violating people's privacy rights as they fly over thousands of homes around the city."
Your children could be some of a growing number of California kids having their writing graded by software instead of a teacher.
Some of the most liberal and conservative members of the state Senate agreed recently that if you buy an iPhone in Los Angeles it shouldn't help pay for police in Cupertino.

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

On paper, the U.S. economy seems to be doing well with historically low unemployment. Yet most Americans have a sour view in recent polls, with stubborn inflation in living costs cited as the reason for that pessimism.
Thanks to Proposition 28, California's K-12 schools are awash in nearly $1 billion in new arts funding. But a coalition of nearly 100 arts groups says that some school districts may be misspending the money, deepening longstanding inequities in arts education.

Tuesday, June 4, 2024

California politics being what they are – deeply blue domination by Democrats – means that many of the races on the November ballot are already decided.

Monday, June 3, 2024

It's time for the folks in California's Capitol to play let's-make-a-deal – or actually, many deals.
Remarkably, it looks like California's public school system will make it through the state's multibillion-dollar budget shortfall more or less intact.
Democratic Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin, a former tech insider, is taking on the industry with a far-reaching bill that would require artificial intelligence developers to disclose what data they use to "train" their systems.
While the federal government appears content to sit back and wait, more than 40 U.S. states are considering hundreds of AI regulation bills.

Tuesday, May 28, 2024

Trail immunity is a confusing area of law that applies a broad definition of what constitutes a trail, and plaintiffs face a high burden in overcoming the immunities granted by the Government Code.
When Gov. Gavin Newsom unveiled a much-revised 2024-25 state budget this month, he became visibly irritated when reporters pressed him about raising taxes to cover a $44.9 billion deficit, particularly the corporate tax hikes that left-leaning groups have suggested to avoid spending cuts in health, welfare and education programs.
Based on their line of questioning, California Supreme Court justices seemed to be reaching for a compromise as they heard oral arguments Tuesday in the long-running legal saga over whether gig workers should be considered independent contractors or employees.
Special interest groups spent more than $114 million to lobby California officials and legislators in the first quarter of this year, matching the pace last year when a record $480 million was spent to influence state policy decisions.
Few places in California are as unforgiving for driving an electric car as the remote and sparsely populated Imperial Valley.

Friday, May 24, 2024

Financial support for the nearly 6 million students in California's public schools is not only the largest chunk of the state budget, but for the past half-century it has been its most contentious element.
In the relentless battle against wildfires in California, it's clear that agencies and landowners must prioritize and implement wildfire prevention measures while continuing to build and maintain firefighting resources.
Homelessness gets top billing in a measure likely to make it onto your November ballot. Whether the measure has anything to do with homelessness is debatable.

Wednesday, May 22, 2024

As Gov. Gavin Newsom and state legislators spend the next few weeks fashioning a state budget that's plagued by a multibillion-dollar deficit, they can't count on a booming economy to make their task easier.

NEWS

General News

Friday, June 21, 2024

An attorney for Chevron Corp. told a San Francisco judge Monday that the state of California's coordinated action accusing a group of the world's biggest oil companies of deceiving the public about the severity of climate crisis should be stayed until the U.S. Supreme Court decides a bid to dismiss two similar lawsuits filed by city governments in Hawaii. He argued that the lawsuit represented a violation of the oil major's commercial free speech rights.
General News

Friday, June 21, 2024

A lawsuit accusing gaming companies including Epic Games Inc. and Microsoft Corp. of specifically developing and designing their products to cause addiction has ended after complaints against each of the defendants were dismissed by a federal court in Illinois.
General News

Friday, June 21, 2024

Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday appointed 15 superior court judges in 11 counties.
General News

Wednesday, June 19, 2024

Workforce As a Service, Inc., the company behind temporary staffing agency WorkWhile, was accused of "brazenly" misclassifying its "low wage, hourly workers" as independent contractors and committing "systemic wage theft" in a lawsuit filed by the State of California on Friday.
General News

Wednesday, June 19, 2024

Down-to-the wire negotiations to avoid an expensive ballot measure fight follow years of mostly failed legal and legislative efforts by business groups to undermine the law known as PAGA.
General News

Wednesday, June 19, 2024

A federal judge in San Francisco met with attorneys for Elon Musk and former Twitter executives suing the billionaire for $128 million in backpay, telling them on Friday that she would stay discovery until deciding on Musk's bid to toss the plaintiffs' equitable relief claim under ERISA.
General News

Wednesday, June 19, 2024

Recently-enacted Senate Bill 553 (SB 553) amended the California Labor Code to require most California employers to establish and implement an effective, written workplace violence prevention plan (WVPP) containing specific information by July 1, 2024. An employer's WVPP must include effective procedures for identifying, evaluating, and correcting workplace violence hazards and reporting and investigating workplace violence incidents.
General News

Tuesday, June 18, 2024

Shopping center landlords have found themselves in a wholly unfamiliar position: For the first time in 20 years, demand for retail space outstrips supply.
General News

Tuesday, June 18, 2024

The Senate Judiciary Committee approved a bill Thursday that would add 63 new district judges across the nation, including 21 in California, starting next year through 2035.
General News

Tuesday, June 18, 2024

A federal judge in San Jose set a false advertising dispute between tax provider Intuit Inc. and H&R Block Inc. for trial in October 2025, commending the parties during a hearing on Thursday for moving the case along efficiently.
General News

Tuesday, June 18, 2024

A proposed gender pay discrimination class action was filed against Apple Inc. in San Francisco Superior Court on Thursday. The lawsuit alleges that Apple's "pay expectation" hiring practice systematically results in female employees being paid less than their male counterparts.
General News

Monday, June 17, 2024

Alameda County Superior Court Judge Noel Wise was nominated Wednesday by President Joe Biden to become a federal judge in the Northern District of California.
General News

Monday, June 17, 2024

Jeffrey F. Rosen, a Democrat who made his name as a reformist prosecutor when he unseated a law-and-order DA in Santa Clara County, on Wednesday endorsed Nathan Hochman, a former Republican turned independent trying to unseat Los Angeles County DA George Gascón, another reformist prosecutor.
General News

Monday, June 17, 2024

A perfect storm of plunging property values for aging buildings, weak tenant demand coming out of the pandemic and high interest rates for new loans and refinancing has left the $2.4 trillion office building sector wobbling.
General News

Monday, June 17, 2024

The most popular dog in the country for the last two years has been the French bulldog, beloved for its batlike ears and deep wrinkles. But because of their flat faces, they are prone to respiratory and eye problems.
General News

Monday, June 17, 2024

Customers of Coinbase Inc. accused the leading cryptocurrency exchange of secretly charging customers a "spread" transaction fee and "doubling down on its deceptive practice" by increasing the hidden fee amount last year.
General News

Thursday, June 13, 2024

Consider a common scenario: You're driving on the highway, thinking about something that happened at work or what you're going to eat for dinner, and your car starts beeping.
General News

Thursday, June 13, 2024

Meta Platforms Inc. will get another chance to duck an investor lawsuit filed in the wake of the 2019 Cambridge Analytica scandal as the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to reconsider the appellate court's ruling moving the case forward.
General News

Thursday, June 13, 2024

A San Francisco judge on Friday expressed doubt that the co-founder of Hippo Enterprises, Inc., an Insurtech company, will be able to prove that he lost at least $15 million in prospective stock sales based on claims that he was deceived into selling some of his stock for a fraction of its value by Hippo's CEO and an executive for one of the company's largest institutional investors' Innovius Capital LLP.
General News

Thursday, June 13, 2024

A 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel appeared dismissive Monday of arguments by an attorney for Palestinian rights organizations that they had any authority to get involved in the decision by President Joe Biden and administration officials sending military aid to Israel that it claims is aiding and abetting a genocide.
General News

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

The federal judge in San Francisco heading the multidistrict litigation against agricultural giant Monsanto, maker of the allegedly carcinogenic weedkiller Roundup, expressed his concern that a plaintiff firm was overstretched and taking on more cases than it could handle.
General News

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

America is saturated with food trademarks. The Cronut? Trademarked. Pop-Tarts? Trademarked. Even grapes that taste like cotton candy, and the mash-up of gai lan and broccoli called Broccolini are legally protected.
General News

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

From sunrise to sunset, the U.S. Border Patrol buses arrived every hour at a sunbaked parking lot in San Diego.
General News

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Ryan D. Nelson recused himself from a case accusing the Biden administration of enabling genocide in Gaza because he traveled to Israel and met with government officials there.
General News

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

A federal antitrust lawsuit filed Friday in San Francisco accused six major hotel operators and a revenue science firm of acting as horizontal competitors and fixing hotel room rates with the help of a pricing algorithm.
General News

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

UC Berkeley has a free hand to develop student housing on the long-disputed People's Park site south of campus as well as future projects in its long-range development plan, the state Supreme Court ruled Thursday.
General News

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

A federal fair-housing law prohibits discrimination in housing based on race, ethnicity, religion and other factors, like gender identity and disability.
General News

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

A multibillion-dollar antitrust class action against the National Football League over the legality of its "Sunday Ticket" broadcast package opened Thursday to a jury in a courtroom so full it spilled into overflow seating.
General News

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

A looming investigation into whether players in the artificial intelligence space have committed incipient violations of antitrust regulations is an attempt by regulators to not be caught "asleep at the wheel" while the tech booms, legal experts say.
General News

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

The federal judge in San Francisco overseeing consolidated litigation against DNA testing service 23andMe related to a data breach affecting millions of people appointed lead counsel for the plaintiffs, citing several factors including experience with multidistrict proceedings.
General News

Monday, June 10, 2024

A Yolo County judge has rejected a California Environmental Quality Act lawsuit attempting to block a proposed reservoir north of Sacramento. He also did so quickly — something that has been a rarity in both CEQA and water litigation in the past — in compliance with a recent state law.
General News

Monday, June 10, 2024

A San Francisco judge on Wednesday declined to toss claims of elder abuse and punitive damages in a wrongful death lawsuit against Owl, Inc., a medical transportation service, brought by the family of an 88-year-old Army veteran, who perished in a car wreck while an Owl passenger.
General News

Monday, June 10, 2024

In 2023, Americans reported they were the victims of more nearly $10 billion in financial fraud1.
General News

Monday, June 10, 2024

If buying a home is an inexorable part of the American dream, so is the next step: eventually selling that home and using the equity to trade up to something bigger.
General News

Friday, June 7, 2024

A divided 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel on Tuesday reversed a major defense win for health care giant Sutter Health in an antitrust class action because of the trial judge's "prejudicial" jury instructions and exclusion of key evidence.
General News

Friday, June 7, 2024

Sometimes it's illegal to spend money that you set aside for yourself.
General News

Friday, June 7, 2024

President Joe Biden's executive order limiting asylum claims is already drawing ire from progressives for its resemblance to policies proposed by former President Donald Trump, which were dealt a legal blow by the courts during his administration. Experts predict the new order will likely meet the same fate.
General News

Friday, June 7, 2024

Walt Disney Pictures is close to resolving a copyright lawsuit brought by a San Francisco film studio claiming infringement of motion capture technology as a federal judge in Oakland dismissed all allegations except those related to 2017's "Beauty and the Beast" remake.
General News

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

The variant, called KP.2, is steadily overtaking what had been the dominant COVID variant for most of the year in the United States, raising the possibility of a summer surge in cases in California and across the nation.
General News

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

In the latest battle of dueling judicial philosophies on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, a divided panel on Friday affirmed a preliminary injunction ordering the release of a class of indigent defendants in Oregon within seven days unless the state can provide them lawyers.
General News

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

Wrapping up a four-day visit to Los Angeles and San Francisco to meet with state officials and tech leaders, a European Union commissioner spoke to reporters on Friday about the governing body's recent efforts to regulate artificial intelligence before the upcoming European Parliament elections.
General News

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

The California Appellate Defense Counsel was founded in the 1980s to train and pay private counsel to represent indigent criminal defendants on appeal in non-capital cases.
General News

Tuesday, June 4, 2024

The murky state of the law about when a government official can block someone from their social media accounts was reinforced Thursday when a 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel was dubious about one lawsuit against a San Francisco County supervisor.
General News

Tuesday, June 4, 2024

The U.S. economy has been an enigma over the past few years. The job market is booming, and consumers are still spending, which is usually a sign of optimism. But if you ask Americans, many will tell you that they feel bad about the economy and are unhappy about President Joe Biden's economic record.
General News

Tuesday, June 4, 2024

A federal judge has thrown out three claims filed by a group representing unhoused people against the City of Sacramento.
General News

Tuesday, June 4, 2024

U.S. regulators at both the federal and state level need to do more to preserve America's competitive edge in the artificial intelligence race, including taking a nuanced approach to governing the technology on an application-by-application basis, an industry leader told an audience at Stanford University Thursday.
General News

Monday, June 3, 2024

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Holly Meyer Lucas estimates that as many as 30 of the 100 houses her real estate team sold in and around Jupiter, Florida, last year were put on the market because their owners could no longer keep up with skyrocketing home insurance.
General News

Monday, June 3, 2024

When David De Clercq traveled to San Francisco last year, he had a few musts on his itinerary: Go to Alcatraz. Try new restaurants. And ride in a self-driving car.
General News

Monday, June 3, 2024

laintiffs representing a class of mentally ill inmates have asked a federal judge to impose a fine of more than $100 million on the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
General News

Monday, June 3, 2024

After securing a win at the U.S. Supreme Court last summer, Coinbase Global Inc. narrowed down on Wednesday a putative class action against the cryptocurrency platform for alleged privacy and security failures as a federal judge in San Francisco dismissed claims by all but one plaintiff.
General News

Monday, June 10, 2024

Counsel for an Argentinean lawyer, accusing Uber Technologies Inc. of making him the "sacrificial lamb" of a criminal probe related to the company's roll out in his country, warned the California Supreme Court against letting businesses "use a contract as a shield" under the state's economic loss rule during oral arguments Tuesday.